Books

Liberal Education and the Corporation: The Hiring and Advancement of College Graduates

Useem’s book “focuses on the corporate career paths of college graduates and on the comparative advantages of liberal arts, business, and engineering degrees, providing data and interpretations essential for policy discussions of curricula reform and corporate management development.”

Why Choose the Liberal Arts?

“In a world where the value of a liberal arts education is no longer taken for granted, Mark William Roche lucidly and passionately argues for its essential importance.”

Not for Profit: Why Democracy Needs the Humanities

“Celebrated philosopher Martha Nussbaum makes a passionate case for the importance of the liberal arts at all levels of education.”

College: What is Was, Is, and Should Be

“As the commercialization of American higher education accelerates, more and more students are coming to college with the narrow aim of obtaining a pre-professional credential. The traditional four-year college experience–an exploratory time for students to discover their passions and test ideas and values with the help of teachers and peers–is in danger of becoming a thing of the past.

In College, prominent cultural critic Andrew Delbanco offers a trenchant defense of such an education, and warns that it is becoming a privilege reserved for the relatively rich. In arguing for what a true college education should be, he demonstrates why making it available to as many young people as possible remains central to America’s democratic promise.”

Sibling Society

“Where have all the grownups gone? In answering that question with the same freewheeling erudition and intuitive brilliance that made Iron John a national bestseller, poet, storyteller and translator Robert Bly tells us that we live in a “sibling society, ” in which adults have regressed into adolescence and adolescents refuse to grow up.”

A Whole New Mind

“In this insightful and entertaining book, which has been translated into 20 languages, Daniel H. Pink offers a fresh look at what it takes to excel. A Whole New Mind reveals the six essential aptitudes on which professional success and personal fulfillment now depend, and includes a series of hands-on exercises culled from experts around the world to help readers sharpen the necessary abilities. This book will change not only how we see the world but how we experience it as well.”

How to Get Any Job

“Stephen Colbert was a philosophy major; YouTube cofounder Chad Hurley was an art major. If you think your college major will determine your life path, think again. This streamlined edition refocuses the emphasis from job search to life launch for readers under 30 who are more attracted to achieving balanced life goals than career advancement. For those who want more than just a job, this book provides practical strategies for building a great and rewarding life.”

Learning Partnerships

“While a common goal of higher education is to improve student learning to prepare young adults for the professional, civic and personal challenges of their lives, few institutions have a model to facilitate these outcomes. Learning Partnerships offers a grounded theory and practical examples of how these objectives can be achieved at the college course, program, and institutional levels.”

In Over Our Heads: The Mental Demands of Modern Life

“If contemporary culture were a school, with all the tasks and expectations meted out by modern life as its curriculum, would anyone graduate? In the spirit of a sympathetic teacher,Robert Kegan guides us through this tricky curriculum, assessing the fit between its complex demands and our mental capacities, and showing what happens when we find ourselves, as we so often do, in over our heads. In this dazzling intellectual tour, he completely reintroduces us to the psychological landscape of our private and public lives.”

Managing Transitions

“The business world is transforming. Stories of layoffs, bankruptcy, mergers, and restructuring appear in the news every day. When these changes hit the workplace, the actual situational shifts are often not as difficult for employees and managers to work through as the psychological components that accompany them. Indeed, organizational transitions affect people; it is always people who have to embrace a new situation and carry out the corresponding change.”

Making Ideas Happen

This book chronicles the methods of exceptionally productive creative leaders and teams – companies like Google, IDEO, and Disney, and individuals like author Chris Anderson and Zappos CEO Tony Hsieh – that make their ideas happen, time and time again.

Making Their Way

What impact does a college education have on students’ careers and personal lives after they graduate? Do they consider themselves well prepared for the complexities, demands and ambiguities of contemporary society? What can we learn from their stories to improve the college learning experience?

This ground-breaking book extends a longitudinal study of 101 male and female college students started by the author in 1986. This book follows the journeys of the young adults remaining in the study—drawing on over 300 new interviews—from graduation to their early thirties.

Managing the Non-Profit Organization

“The nonprofit sector is growing rapidly, creating a major need for expert advice on how to manage these organizations effectively. Management legend Peter Drucker provides excellent examples and explanations of mission, leadership, resources, marketing, goals, and much more. Interviews with nine experts also address key issues in this booming sector.”

Getting from College to Career

“How do you get a job without experience and get experience without a job? It’s the question virtually every college student or recent graduate faces. In Getting from College to Career, Lindsey Pollak offers the first definitive guide to building the experience, skills, and confidence you need before starting your first major job search. Her 90 action-oriented tips include strategies ranging from the simple to the expert.”

101 Ways to Say Thank You

“In a world of abrupt, hastily typed e-mails and instant messages, the art of pen-and-paper note writing may seem lost, yet nothing else says “thank you” with quite the same elegance or sincerity. Now you will never again struggle to find the right words for that beautifully penned message. Endorsed by Crane Stationery, Notes of Gratitude provides the perfectly worded thank-yous for nearly every occasion, from baby showers and christenings to business interviews and charitable donations.”

Bird by Bird: Some Instructions on Writing and Life

“Thirty years ago my older brother, who was ten years old at the time, was trying to get a report on birds written that he’d had three months to write. It was due the next day. We were out at our family cabin in Bolinas, and he was at the kitchen table close to tears, surrounded by binder paper and pencils and unopened books on birds, immobilized by the hugeness of the task ahead. Then my father sat down beside him, put his arm around my  brother’s shoulder, and said, ‘Bird by bird, buddy.  Just take it bird by bird.’”

With this basic instruction always in mind, Anne Lamott returns to offer us a new gift: a step-by-step guide on how to write and on how to manage the writer’s life. From “Getting Started,’ with “Short Assignments,” through “Shitty First Drafts,” “Character,” “Plot,” “Dialogue.” all the way from “False Starts” to “How Do You Know When You’re Done?” Lamott encourages, instructs, and inspires. She discusses “Writers Block,” “Writing Groups,” and “Publication.” Bracingly honest, she is also one of the funniest people alive.

The Tipping Point: How Little Things Can Make a Big Difference

“The tipping point is that magic moment when an idea, trend, or social behavior crosses a threshold, tips, and spreads like wildfire. Just as a single sick person can start an epidemic of the flu, so too can a small but precisely targeted push cause a fashion trend, the popularity of a new product, or a drop in the crime rate. This widely acclaimed bestseller, in which Malcolm Gladwell explores and brilliantly illuminates the tipping point phenomenon, is already changing the way people throughout the world think about selling products and disseminating ideas.”

Never Eat Alone: And Other Secrets to Success, One Relationship at a Time

“Do you want to get ahead in life? Climb the ladder to personal success? The secret, master networker Keith Ferrazzi claims, is in reaching out to other people. As Ferrazzi discovered early in life, what distinguishes highly successful people from everyone else is the way they use the power of relationships—so that everyone wins.

In Never Eat Alone, Ferrazzi lays out the specific steps—and inner mindset—he uses to reach out to connect with the thousands of colleagues, friends, and associates on his Rolodex, people he has helped and who have helped him.

10 Things Employers Want You to Learn in College

“Building on the reactions of readers and audiences to the first edition of 10 Things, Bill Coplin’s revised edition adds new material to help college students find a solid career path once they graduate college.  His emphasis on skills and career exploration, both inside and outside the classroom, is even more crucial than when he first wrote this widely used book in 2003. The new edition recognizes changes in technology and the job market over the past ten years that will help college graduates launch themselves into successful careers.”

Job Smarts for Twenty Something’s

“The brainchild of Bradley Richardson, an entrepreneur who at 28, became president of his own company, this simple guide to job hunting and career planning is packed with firsthand advice from successful twentysomethings. Savvy, pragmatic, and even fun to read with great cartoons, this book is the next best thing to a trust fund.”

College (Un)bound

“In College (Un)bound, Jeffrey J. Selingo, editor at large for The Chronicle for Higher Education, argues that America’s higher education system is broken. The great credential race has turned universities into big business and fostered an environment where middle tier colleges can command elite university-level tuition while concealing staggeringly low graduation rates and churning out students with few hard skills into the job market.

Selingo not only turns a critical eye to the current state of affairs in higher education, but he also predicts how technology will transform it for the better. Free massive online open courses (MOOCs) and hybrid classes, adaptive learning software, and the unbundling of traditional degree credits will increase access to high quality education regardless of budget or location and tailor lesson plans to individual needs. One thing is certain—the Class of 2020 will have a radically different college experience than their parents.”

Free Agent Nation

“In this landmark book, Daniel H. Pink offers the definitive account of this revolution in work. He shows who these free agents are — from the marketing consultant down the street to the home-based “mompreneur” to the footloose technology contractor — and why they’ve forged a new path.”

Race Against the Machine

“In Race Against the Machine, MIT’s Brynjolfsson and McAfee bring together a range of statistics, examples, and arguments to show that technological progress is accelerating, and that this trend has deep consequences for skills, wages, and jobs. The book makes the case that employment prospects are grim for many today not because there’s been technology has stagnated, but instead because we humans and our organizations aren’t keeping up.”

You Majored in What?

“In You Majored In What?, nationally known career counselor Dr. Katharine Brooks dispels the myths and the old-fashioned thinking that can make your transition to the “real world” so daunting and chaotic. Developed from more than twenty years of teaching and guiding students to successful careers, her Wise Wanderings career coaching system helps you mine your academic and life experiences for career gold through creative yet practical techniques including visual mapping, storytelling, and experimenting.”

I Could Do Anything, If Only I Knew What It Was

“A life without direction is a life without passion.  The dynamic follow-up to the phenomenal best-seller WishcraftI Could Do Anything If I Only Knew What It Was (the New York Times Bestseller) guides you, not to another unsatisfying job, but to a richly rewarding career rooted in your heart’s desire.  And in a work of true emancipation, this life-changing sourcebook reveals how you can recapture “long lost” goals, overcome the blocks that inhibit your success, decide what you want to be, and live your dreams forever!”

The Marketplace of Ideas: Reform and Resistance in the American University

“The publication of The Marketplace of Ideas has precipitated a lively debate about the future of the American university system: what makes it so hard for colleges to decide which subjects are required? Why are so many academics against the concept of interdisciplinary studies? From his position at the heart of academe, Harvard professor Louis Menand thinks he’s found the answer. Despite the vast social changes and technological advancements that have revolutionized the society at large, general principles of scholarly organization, curriculum, and philosophy have remained remarkably static. Sparking a long-overdue debate about the future of American education, The Marketplace of Ideas argues that twenty-first-century professors and students are essentially trying to function in a nineteenth-century system, and that the resulting conflict threatens to overshadow the basic pursuit of knowledge and truth.”

Made to Stick: Why Some Ideas Survive and Others Die

“Why do some ideas thrive while others die? And how do we improve the chances of worthy ideas? In Made to Stick, accomplished educators and idea collectors Chip and Dan Heath tackle head-on these vexing questions. Inside, the brothers Heath reveal the anatomy of ideas that stick and explain ways to make ideas stickier, such as applying the “human scale principle,” using the “Velcro Theory of Memory,” and creating “curiosity gaps.”

Millennials Rising: The Next Great Generation

“In this remarkable account, certain to stir the interest of educators, counselors, parents, and people in all types of business as well as young people themselves, Neil Howe and William Strauss introduce the nation to a powerful new generation: the Millennials.”

Generation Me: Why Today’s Young Americans are More Confident, Assertive, Entitled – and More Miserable Than Ever Before

“Called “The Entitlement Generation” or Gen Y, they are storming into schools, colleges, and businesses all over the country. In this provocative new book, headline-making psychologist and social commentator Dr. Jean Twenge explores why the young people she calls “Generation Me”—those born in the 1970s, 1980s, and 1990s—are tolerant, confident, open-minded, and ambitious but also cynical, depressed, lonely, and anxious.”

Luck is No Accident: Making the Most of Happenstance in Your Life and Career

“Unplanned events — chance occurrences — more often determine life and career choices than all the careful planning we do. A chance meeting, a broken appointment, a spontaneous vacation trip, a fill-in job, a hobby — these are the kinds of experiences that lead to unexpected life directions and career choices. LUCK IS NO ACCIDENT is the first career planning book that actively encourages readers to create their own unplanned events, to anticipate changing their plans frequently, to take advantage of chance events when they happen, and to make the most of what life offers.”